Dec 7, 2022

Mawazo Writing Africa

Writing about the main

One year after Ramaphosa’s addresses on July unrest, what has changed?

It has been nearly a year since President Cyril Ramaphosa addressed the nation on the devastating public violence, looting and crime that has engulfed parts of KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng.

Ramaphosa made three speeches over several days while security forces struggled to restore order.

The violence and looting erupted after days of protests in KwaZulu-Natal over the detention of the former President Jacob Zuma.

In a speech, Ramaphosa promised to restore calm and authorized the deployment of the military to support the police.

How Reflecting on life a year after the riots, here are some claims and promises made by Ramaphosa during his addresses:

POLITICAL MOTIVES AND OPPORTUNISTIC ACTS OF CRIME

“In the early days of these riots, there may have been some people trying to agitate for violence and disorder along ethnic lines. We know that the majority of our people have refused, on principle, to be mobilized in this direction.

“What we are witnessing, however, are opportunistic criminal acts with groups of people inciting them to chaos only as a cover for looting and theft.”

THOSE INVOLVED IN VIOLENT ACTS WILL BE ARRESTED AND PROSECUTE

“Let Um make it clear say: We will take action to protect every person in this country from threats of violence, intimidation, theft and looting.

“We will not hesitate to arrest and prosecute those who commit these commit and will commit acts Make sure they face the full force of our law.”

FOOD DISEASE AND LOSS OF EMPLOYMENT

“Stores have been looted and the infrastructure destroyed. That means our sick people can’t get medicine from pharmacies, food can’t get onto supermarket shelves, and healthcare workers can’t go to work.

“These disruptions will cost lives by disrupting the supply chains that keep our food, our health and our health maintain production systems. The path of violence, plunder and anarchy only leads to more violence and devastation. It leads to more poverty, more unemployment and more loss of innocent lives.

“This afternoon, ministers and senior officials from the Economic and Security Clusters met with Business Unity SA to take stock of the situation and develop coordinated actions . We have agreed to work together to ensure the safety of drivers, cashiers, patients and customers.

“We have agreed to share information and resources to ensure we restore critical supply chains.”

DEPLOY ARMY AND STRENGTHEN POLICE

“As Commander-in-Chief of the SA Defense Forces, I approved today the deployment of military personnel in support of the operations of the Police Service.

“The National Joint Operational and Intelligence Structure, known as NatJOINTS, has intensified its operations in all affected areas in KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng.

“The Police Service is taking action to evacuate responders from holiday and rest days to increase law enforcement presence on the ground.”

GOVERNMENT MET WITH COMMUNITIES TO PROMOTE STABILITY

“We are making arrangements for government leaders and public Che representatives as part of their responsibility to meet with community leaders to promote stability.

“As part of our ongoing engagement with key sectors of society, I will meet with leaders of political parties to review the current situation to discuss.

“We are urged, wherever we may be, to remain calm, exercise restraint and resist all attempts to incite violence, incite panic or foment division.”< /p>

PATH OF HEALING, REBUILDING AND RENEWING

“We have begun a process of healing, rebuilding and renewal. We have set our country on a path of progress and recovery. We cannot allow a few of us to threaten this collective effort.

“We will protect our rule of law democracy so that we can consolidate our achievements. We will reject violence and chaos so that we can move forward. Let me repeat, we build, we don’t close.

“As South Africans, we will not let the task ahead of us deter us.”

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